Will Consumers Flock to Windows 8?

The Windows 8 Consumer Preview (beta) has been out for a couple days now, and speculation is running rampant as to whether or not consumers will consider Windows 8 a success, or just a second coming of the PR failure that was Windows Vista.

Personally, I’m a long-time Windows user with a long history of early adoptions, disappointments, and through all of this have remained an optimist. With Windows 8, I’m still on the fence. While the beta gives us a good idea of what the final product might look like, one can only hope a lot changes take place between now and then.

The biggest question facing Microsoft and its users is whether or not Windows 8 will be something consumers will accept. That’s the most important factor to consider, after all. If only a few people upgrade to Windows 8, developers will have little reason to build apps for the Metro UI. Computer manufacturers may, as with Windows Vista, continue to request licenses for Windows 7. However, if Windows 8 is a smashing success, it could have major implications for the world of technology as a whole. For the first time, a desktop interface would be consistent across desktops, tablets (modern definition), and even smartphones.

The Consumer Preview

The app previews, including the Mail app, are buggy at best. It takes some getting used to going to the right of the screen instead of the top to access a menu. This change in processes is jarring for me, and would undoubtedly be the same for “normal” users that have enough trouble operating within the current Windows environment.

Windows 8 features a lot of changes. If there is one thing the general consumer market responds unpredictably to it’s change. Either they embrace it as a revolutionary new way of doing things or see it as a disappointing disgrace. The question facing Microsoft (and any software development house working on their next big release) is how to accurately gauge the potential popularity of these changes.

Contrary to the very nature of a beta preview, many early adopters are forming their opinions of Windows 8 based on the performance and details present in the consumer preview. For some, that means expressing your likes, dislikes, and moving back to whatever platform it is you used originally.

While it may not be advisable to base your entire opinion of an operating system that may not be ready for prime time for months, or even a year from now, people can and will do so. Right now, there are conversations taking place in IT departments, on blogs, and in social forums right now as to whether or not Windows 8 will be a flop. This very article is an example of that, and the public consensus is being built as we speak.

Whether consumers will or will not flock to Windows 8 depends greatly on this public perception. After all, if you hear from someone that heard from someone that read on a blog somewhere that an OS you’ve never used yourself was bad, you might begin to believe it. I know I heard more than a few people scream about what a miserable failure Windows Vista was before they even used it. Granted, it wasn’t Microsoft’s best work, obviously.

What about Windows Phone 7? That’s a fairly good mobile OS, but it will never compete with iOS or Android on the level it could if the public perception of the Microsoft brand wasn’t tainted by bad publicity. This publicity that itself is a double-edged sword. This is one reason why Windows 7 was considered a success. The public beta presented a completed OS that had very few tweaks needed prior to going live. Windows 8 depends on third-party apps to fill its new store model, and those just aren’t coming as fast as beta users would hope. Don’t worry, they’ll be there soon enough.

Windows 7 Was Good, So Windows 8 Must be Bad

John C. Dvorak of PCMag.com recently published his take on the situation, citing that the public perception that every other version of Windows is terrible may hinder the acceptance of the update. This perception is becoming a meme in its own sorts, with countless mockups of various Windows releases set against rotating good and bad labels. But is this the truth?

But is this the truth? Windows 2000 was no slouch, and while Windows ME was seen as a widespread goof, the two were released within months of each other. One, based on NT while the other relied on the older DOS platform. In a sense, they were very different.

Windows 2000 paved the way to Windows XP, which was also considered to be a major success for Microsoft.

What does Windows ME, Vista, and other side projects including Microsoft Bob have in common? They were all introduced with major changes to the user experience. Vista took high points of the aging Windows XP interface and added a wide range of tools, not all of which were compatible to older hardware and software. This created a jarring experience for the user, and a frustrating one for anyone that relied on older technology to get work done.

Windows 7 was considered a good release by many due to its smaller resource footprint, smoother interface, and more minimalistic approach to getting things done. Where Vista overcomplicated things, Windows 7 simplified them. It also didn’t hurt that Microsoft offered an open beta that allowed anyone and everyone the opportunity to run it for free for a year prior to the release. Things like that matter, and that was arguably one of the biggest advantages Windows 7 had out of the gate.

Can Windows 8 Exceed Expectations?

The Windows 8 Consumer Preview has been out for a few days, and the new factor is wearing off for some (including myself). The hard truth facing consumers moving forward is that we don’t know exactly what the release candidates, or gold master will be like. We can only guess based on what’s presently been released. So far, the reviews are mixed.

There are points about Windows 8 that I absolutely love, and points that I can’t stand. Major changes such as putting the menus on the right side of the screen rather than on top will be a jarring change for many home users, and one can only hope that Microsoft finds a way to mitigate this difference.

Perhaps having two versions of Windows 8 available. One provides a user experience that largely resembles the Windows we know and love, with the Start page appearing only when specifically called. The other, perhaps more geared towards touch interfaces and tablets, would offer the full potential of the Metro UI. For now, we can only hope that Microsoft responds to the feedback given through the beta test. For better or for worse, change is coming to the Windows platform.

If Microsoft pays attention to users of the Consumer Preview, and makes public acknowledgements of this feedback, it has a chance. In the end, the business of technology is greatly dependent on good marketing and great word-of-mouth. If Windows 8 is to change its stars, it needs a lot of both.

Perhaps John C. Dvorak is absolutely right when he said, “It’s inevitable since Windows 7 was considered a decent operating system–Windows 8 is going to be called crap, whether it is or not.”

What do you think? Will Windows 8 be a flop or a success based on information currently available?

Article Written by

Ryan Matthew Pierson has worked as a broadcaster, writer, and producer for media outlets ranging from local radio stations to internationally syndicated programs. His experience includes every aspect of media production. He has over a decade of experience in terrestrial radio, Internet multimedia, and commercial video production.

  • CameronMcintyre

    i found windows 8 a great way to re introduce Microsoft but some features can be stressful and unwanted at times

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1197713335 Jacob Stienecker

    I find the xbox live to be a must delete section. it irritates me to no end. im sorry but really Microsoft? separate your gaming console away from your operating system. you make a lot of gamers(non xbox junkies mad) by just even having this in here preinstalled 

    • Edlak

      Uninstall it, what’s the big deal. I have a 360 so I love it.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1197713335 Jacob Stienecker

        i like w8 but its has to serperate its self a little. thats like saying Budweiser introducing a non achol beverage that advertized against each other

        • http://twitter.com/yardmanflex yardmanflex

          Jacob Stienecker sir you my friend are an idiot…Microsoft is finally linking all there product and you are bitching about it.. 

    • Danny

      You say separate your gaming console away from your operating system.. but surely by merging the two they are ultimately creating a more enhanced gaming and pc using service. And how do you know that they are making a lot of gamers mad (are you now a representative of gamers now). If you don’t like that feature then it’s simple, UNINSTALL IT AND LEAVE EVERYONE ALONE.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1197713335 Jacob Stienecker

    your a computer os and or a tablet os. not a game console. feature game apps like steam. i feel left out of the market because i decide to game on my pc instead of a ps3 or a xbox.. thats like microsoft having cake and eating it too. #uncalledfor

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1197713335 Jacob Stienecker

    your a computer os and or a tablet os. not a game console. feature game apps like steam. i feel left out of the market because i decide to game on my pc instead of a ps3 or a xbox.. thats like microsoft having cake and eating it too. #uncalledfor

  • http://twitter.com/Broojo Joseph Brooke

    I feel that OS X Mountain Lion is doing the whole merger of mobile into PC better than Windows 8, there really is a splitting of the OS in Windows 8 while ML wants to add iOS features into the current scheme of things without disturbing a perfectly well functioning OS.

    Simple things like the removal of the start button may alienate users who have grown up using Windows in the way they are used to, you have seen how bad some people react to change, this will BLOW their minds :P

    • http://www.bharatkumargupta.com/ Bharat Kumar Gupta

      totally agree with you and same reason why alike most people are more interested in hearing news from apple abt their os then watching updates from ms, ser who even subscribes to ms on youtube or other sources, its non interesting thats what it is.

  • http://twitter.com/Broojo Joseph Brooke

    I feel that OS X Mountain Lion is doing the whole merger of mobile into PC better than Windows 8, there really is a splitting of the OS in Windows 8 while ML wants to add iOS features into the current scheme of things without disturbing a perfectly well functioning OS.

    Simple things like the removal of the start button may alienate users who have grown up using Windows in the way they are used to, you have seen how bad some people react to change, this will BLOW their minds :P

  • http://twitter.com/EnvoyOfTheEnd Ian Bunting

    It is called the Consumer Preview for a reason, in that it is where the users, the Consumers are meant to be getting a good impression of the end-product.
    Yes we shouldn’t have have as end-users judged the Developer Preview as representative, but this should be.

    Whatever we are told, this is a Tablet/Mobile Phone OS shoehorned into a PC environement.
    In trying to merge them something had to give, there had to be a compromise.

    And the usability for non-touch users was what suffered.

    There is a reason why a desktop MacOS and iPad look and function differently.
    Because of the hugely varying interface and format they are inherently different and the interfaces have different needs.
    If Microsoft are going to be thought of as copying Apple then that is one lesson they need to follow.

  • http://twitter.com/EnvoyOfTheEnd Ian Bunting

    It is called the Consumer Preview for a reason, in that it is where the users, the Consumers are meant to be getting a good impression of the end-product.
    Yes we shouldn’t have have as end-users judged the Developer Preview as representative, but this should be.

    Whatever we are told, this is a Tablet/Mobile Phone OS shoehorned into a PC environement.
    In trying to merge them something had to give, there had to be a compromise.

    And the usability for non-touch users was what suffered.

    There is a reason why a desktop MacOS and iPad look and function differently.
    Because of the hugely varying interface and format they are inherently different and the interfaces have different needs.
    If Microsoft are going to be thought of as copying Apple then that is one lesson they need to follow.

  • Droopnb

    I believe, like pre-beta, users will be able to switch to Win7-like desktop

  • galenwolf

    Considering the issue of most ‘consumers’ not using this preview I think it might be a good idea for those who us who dual boot to let our families try it out and give Microsoft video feedback of the actual average user using this OS.

    If nothing else the mountain of youtube “windows 8 reaction” vidoes with people going “WHAT THE £$%& IS THIS PILE OF £$£@!!!” should be hilarious.

  • Edlak

    The only complain I’ve been hearing over and over again it’s about the replacement of start menu. I love the new one. It has a superior search and it offers a lot of information at a glance. The desktop is still there with every feature win7 had and some more. 

  • Abo_alrm2010

    they are just trying to copy every thing others has already done……apple is much better because it invents new experiences and this Windows 8 is just SHIT i prefer Windows 7 and XP than this

    • Eike_30

      apple has been copying linux distro’s for years  the last thing they invented was the personal computer either they have stolen/bought or copied from others

  • Ron_Schenone

    I personally believe that Windows 8 on a tablet will be stellar and perform well. However, on a desktop I see no purpose adding more confusion to the OS. Just saying. :-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000761282259 Anibal Velez

    The question is what is under the hood, and the changes that windows 8 brings? For me I find that windows 8 under the hood change dramatically the security is far exceed the windows7 and the network capabilities are great. I often hear the metro this, the metro that, but really no body check what is the inside the great technology and effort in this version. but I must add “I do not like the Metro” well at least I believe there most be another version for PC.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Cornelia-Cornflake/100002692962280 Cornelia Cornflake


    The biggest question facing Microsoft and its users is whether or not Windows 8 will be something consumers will accept.”

    Not for me, it isn’t! The biggest question is why we need another full version at all (other than to swell Microsoft’s coffers yet further, obviously). How about putting some effort into improving W7 instead? It’s not like the web isn’t replete with suggestions for doing so most of which have been ignored!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Cornelia-Cornflake/100002692962280 Cornelia Cornflake


    The biggest question facing Microsoft and its users is whether or not Windows 8 will be something consumers will accept.”

    Not for me, it isn’t! The biggest question is why we need another full version at all (other than to swell Microsoft’s coffers yet further, obviously). How about putting some effort into improving W7 instead? It’s not like the web isn’t replete with suggestions for doing so most of which have been ignored!

  • http://twitter.com/markbyrn markbyrn

    Dvorak doesn’t make sense; following his logic in reverse, Windows 7 must be good whether it is or not because Vista was bad.  The problem is Microsoft typically takes two releases each time they re-invent the OS to get it right; Windows 7 is just Vista all fixed up.  By releasing Windows 8 beta as a consumer preview, it might allow Microsoft to fix all the obvious problems before it goes on sale.  I like the Metro UI but the kluge of the original desktop interface with the Metro UI is unbelievably bad at this point and simple tasks such as shutting down or restarting now take extra steps and are not intuitive – shutting down from the charms settings menu – really MS?  

    • FranticFinn

      who shuts down their computer?

  • http://zagorath.wordpress.com Zagorath

    Hey can anyone help me to install the Consumer Preview on my Mac using Bootcamp WITHOUT a USB? I only have DVDs.

  • http://twitter.com/OzzaOwen Owen Norton

    I have installed it but how do I remove it? HELP!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1260047238 Michael Sitver

    I like Windows 8 So far.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1260047238 Michael Sitver

    I like Windows 8 So far.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=689948325 Yehavi Klein

    I certainly did :)

  • http://twitter.com/br3akth3lim1t Nathan Barnett

     Windows 8 is just going to push more people to Linux and Mac… (I typed this from Xubuntu.)

  • Guest

    I do not look forward to windows 8. I think it will look really nice on a tablet but on a desktop Microsoft, Microsoft you are tempting me to get a Mac. They think everyone will buy a touchscreen computer just to take advantage of all the features. I like having the start menu it is very easy to use. Now this o no

  • Mark

    I own a Windows 7 PC and a Windows Phone 7 device, and they are both my day-to-day machines.  I happen to think that both are amazing.  Aero on Windows 7 provides a robust, easy-to-use desktop experience.  Metro on Windows Phone 7 provides a simple and intuitive touch experience.  I tried out Windows 8, and the Metro and Aero design philosophies just don’t work together.  They cannot coexist without detracting from each other’s best features.  That said, I do feel that Microsoft will eventually realize that now is NOT the right time to be merging its mobile and desktop experiences.  If a Metro-based Windows 8 is released for tablets and an Aero-based version is released for desktops, I do feel that Windows 8 will be a hit.

  • Lmcleme

    here is a non-review if I ever read one!

    • Tomgates Ecom

      its not meant to be a review.. its a collection of thoughts and opinions about the potential success or not of Microsoft’s next operating system

  • Reid Sprague

    I find it striking that a lot of complaints about new interfaces – whether Win8, Gnome3 or Ubuntu Unity – seem to center on seemingly minor stuff like moved menus, etc. 

    Maybe I’m unusual, but I can adapt to things like that over a short period of time and without much trouble. Right now I have several computers I use, of varying ages and OSs, with menus and close-window boxes situated hither and yon, and going between them doesn’t pose a problem. Sometimes a slight hesitation, then – Oh, yeah! – and we’re back in business. I don’t think that’s so important.

    Workflow is the key point. If a new arrangement (after a decent interval to get used to it) doesn’t complement your workflow, then THAT’S a problem. We’ll have to see, as Matt says, how this shakes out in Win8.

    After a couple of tries with Unity, Ubuntu seems to have a much better working UI than at first blush. Maybe MS will tread the same path. Letting the public have at it will help! So let’s not judge it too harshly. Maybe trying it and sending in feedback would be a better response!

  • Micah Brown

    Exactly.  If they offered that option then I think a lot of people would welcome it more.  I played a little more with it last night and I think this new UI would be good for newbies or older people who really haven’t gotten into computer much.  It kind of dumbs everything down a little.  I have never seen a Windows 7 phone but from what im gathering it is using a UI similar to this.  On a phone and a tablet im sure this would work great.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=556405213 Fil Sapia

    Windows 8 will not be successful with both the Classic and Metro interfaces working together. As a power-user, I do not want to even see a Metro, it does not make our lives any easier for people working with a keyboard and mouse (most businesses and PC users). Plus it just does not work, the interfaces are completely different from each-other. Microsoft need to rethink their strategy, if they want businesses and power-users to switch they need to gradually improve Windows like they did in Windows 7 and OS Lion. Windows 8 just isn’t the answer for users who use their computer for productivity and even gaming.

  • Daniel

    All im gonna say is that this review is the biggest load of shit I have ever seen… Have u actually used the consumer preview your self or are you just guessing all of this because it is all wrong you fucking idiot.

  • Daniel

    All im gonna say is that this review is the biggest load of shit I have ever seen… Have u actually used the consumer preview your self or are you just guessing all of this because it is all wrong you fucking idiot.

    • Alglasser

      Pig language

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=688046780 facebook-688046780

    If Win8 doesn’t make drastic changes to Metro and how it interacts with the underlying Win7, it will flop and honestly be worse than Vista. People are tired of spending $150-300 for a new operating system from MS every 2-3 years when it doesn’t have a compelling reason to do so. Win7 is a good OS that MS should have then taken up the OS X model of incremental upgrades with very low cost. Charge $29 every year to get Win7.1 or 7.2. People don’t feel cheated that way. Releasing a lemon every other 2-3 year cycle for $200 is just stupid.

    • http://twitter.com/Stephen_Floyd Stephen Floyd


      If Win8 doesn’t make drastic changes to Metro and how it interacts with the underlying Win7″  This statement shows you have no understanding of Windows 8 at all. Windows 8 and Metro aren’t “on top of” Windows 7. In fact just the opposite. Windows 8 have a completely new file system and app system. The desktop mode, known from Windows 7, is just an APP inside of Windows 8. 

      • Rlm3rd

        Steven,

        I respectfully acknowledge your expertise.. Nevertheless, while I may well be the exception, it seems to me that computers – having become a “mainstream” product – are no longer the exclusive domain of highly trained and knowledgably enthusiasts. It’s evolved to the point that I think more purchases are made by “every-day, everyman” kind of buyers instead. As a 50th percentile kind of guy myself, I think the user field has split into two groups, and I believe that evryman-type users comprise the larger of the two. Again in my opinion, that’s where Apple has trumped MS.

        They’ve developed an OS that seems far more intuitive to an average user, more stabile, and – for whatever reason – less apt to be compromised by virus and malware. After spending 40 years engaged in sales related work, I’ve come to the inescapable conclusion that perception IS reality for most buyers, and the perception of many consumers seems to be that Apple does it more simply and more reliably than MS because they have oriented themselves with what the majority of their users want instead of what the vendor want to give them. The sales results quoted in this article would seem to bear that out.

        My own feeling is that, when the day that I have to learn a new OS arrives because my hardware died, I believe I’ll break my 15 year Windows habit and give Apple a shot at the title. It couldn’t hurt.

  • MR.SOUR

    windows 8 will be good providing theres nice hardwear to back it up because the best softwear in the world isnt going to make a crap computer run any better or look nicer.

  • Jorge Aldunate

    I think that Microsoft should be doing like Apple. New realeses, but with cummulative upgrades, not whole new interfaces!

  • Shawnlindsay18

    I don’t get why people think Vista was so bad? What happened was people bought inferior desktops/laptops to run Vista on, ya know like eMachines brand and what not. I thought Vista was a great Operating System because I had it running on an Alienware computer aka “Good Computer.” Then once they released SP1, Vista got even better and most “techies” will tell you that! I just don’t like the hate on Vista when it was a good OS, sure it had its flaws but what OS doesn’t. If you look on Mac forums you can read post after post on how they hate launchpad and mission control, does that make it a bad OS? FAR from it! I rest my case.

  • Terord

    I think the windows community would grow after people truly experience it in a touch environment. the tiles definately simplifies everything, i think the main issue would be how softwares and apps are intergrated into the windows experience.
    I really think windows would begin to experience growth but i think the real problem is how big co-operations would react to this

  • Terord

    Coming from a country where computers are just making it into the daily lives of people apart from co-operations, the consumers are swayed easily to touch experiences and the growing numbers of touch devices are soaring. In a market dominated by windows with a touch experience they really stand to mentain their market here, if they can get the OS in an ipad device.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1813155844 Antim Evtimov Batchev

    i think windows is trying to add too much on their os … they are trying to add features from android, ios, osx, windows 7, xbox and windows phone … its simply too much 

  • http://twitter.com/ted_price1 Ted Price

    I enjoy em all.  I have machines using linux,mac, xp, and window8  all has it good points and bad points

  • Shawn Rainey

    just linking back to you guys 
    http://www.online-video-magazine.com/windows.html

  • David

    MS will probably do what it’s done several times before.  After a while, support for Win7 will be discontinued, and you’ll have no choice but to go to 8, or whatever OS they have at the time.

  • http://www.caseyfrennier.com/ Casey Frennier

    I think people are going to be afraid of it. Will be like vista all over again. People are going to hate all over it.

  • Sam Simpson

    I wouldn’t compare Windows 8 to Vista, more like Windows ME.  The Metro is useless to me, and on a Desktop computer Windows 7 is much better.  I’ve reverted back to Windows 7 and am going to stay there too.

  • Orthead

    I do graphics on a desktop PC. I do not need or want a touchscreen nightmare (I’ve used touchscreens).

    I have four computers. I bought a new one last year (HP) with Windows 7, and after three months of constant problems, went back to Vista.

    I do not have time to experiment with Windows 8.

  • Michael Klade

    I will probably wait for a tablet with 8 installed; so far 8 does not run well an my Dell 1525 laptop which was upgraded from vista, downgraded to xp, and now 8.  I will not install 8 on my hp desktop or  laptop running 7 pro 64bit.  Windows 8 does not seem to compare with my toshipa thrive running android honeycomb. Microsoft has a lot of work to do on a cross platform os, also what will be the cost ($$, or $$$) of 8??

  • John Bickford

    I have installed and used every new version since the days of the PC1 in 1981. I stayed the course with Windows ME, Vista, etc., installing betas and the first “golden” disks. Windows 8 is looking to be the first exception to all that. The code is already in the bit-bucket, not archived for later consideration.

  • Gary

    Windows 8 on a tablet may be wonderful and may perform well. However, for my old desktop I see no purpose adding more confusion to the OS.  I am an old “DOS” user and have watched Microsoft do it’s change for the sake of change thing since.

    I went out the day it arrived & foolishly bought DOS 4 & it didn’t work worth a damm.  I then tiried Win 1 & 2 and found I was still better off with DOS 3.1!  Win 3 was a bit better, but DOS 5 & 6 was still my choice  when I wanted to do real work.. Then came the first version of Windows (95) that maybe did things a bit better than my old DOS!  Then there was Win 98, a system that really worked. After fooling around with ME, and Vista I decided Windows was a dead issue!  Then Microsoft surprised me with Win XP. WOW!  I admit that the box had to be upgraded to run it.  But by God it did work.  Now having got lazy in my old age I upgraded the box again and use Win 7 Again it works unlike so many of the Mircrosoft miss-steps.

     I am slow to change my mind but  I really can’t see Win 8 as having any avantage.  The other thing that bothers me with so many new OSs  is the fact that much of my old equipment that works perfect but has to junked as the new system has no driver for it. … not great for the environment!

    Gary 

  • Worrell4869

    LOng LIve Windows 7

  • geordyboy80

    It should be sold as Windows Tablet, certainly not an improvement on Windows 7, it is a radical shift in system!

  • BobinOrlando

    No, the users won’t, and as an IT guy with 40 years in the field, no one in IT is going to touch this thing.

    It is a piece of crap. It may be fine for a telephone but it is horrible for a “computer”. It might be “cool” for tweens and teeny boppers with colored hair; however, for a grown adult who has REAL experience with computers and a job to do, it is a disaster.

    IMHO, it is so bad that instead of rolling back to 7, I loaded Ubuntu and am using that OS almost all the time. I think back to the DOS 4,0 mess I see another repeat “here”.

  • Marty Johnson

    i was perfectly happy with xp on my laptop and desktop. i built a new tower and had to put 7 on it that’s it i’m done no 8. i’m like your father i’m 60 and don’t like change either.

  • Johnsutherland

    I couldn’t do anything with it so reloaded computer from backup. But then as I have two hard drives, I reloaded it on my second smaller drive. So I have played around with it for a week now and have learned a lot about it, but still not comfortable with present version. I find it quite interesting and challenging. Personally I think I would buy as it is an improvement on my old Windows XP. Perhaps the learning curve will put a lot of people off
    I have been using computers since the early 90’s and am only 84 years old. What a long way we have come . Many years I paid over 30 dollars for one of the little hand helds that would only add and subtract. I skipped the Windows 7. Built my own computer  a couple of years ago. Always changing it. Keeps me busy and alert.

    John

  • Vincent

    The majority of  (L)users are going to eat whatever shit M$ crams into them…
    The new systems, starting with Vista are unfit for professional use. Right in this very moment I am running 16 applications on 2 displays, 2 of the applications are in fact virtual machines with a separate 4-5 app each. I need to see everything that’s running on my desktop and switch fast to the application I need. This is impossible on the new interface, which is for people who barely use 2-3 apps ever.
    So no switching to Win 8 ever for me. Currently I am trying to find equivalents to my usual Windows tools for Debian. I am almost there… Once I get a comfortable set of tools for Debian – GOOD BYE WINDOWS!!!

  • hank

    What a total waste of time this article was, so full of hot air and nothing else you would think a politician wrote it.

  • http://twitter.com/Karina1003 Karina1003

    Even if it’s good, it’s ridiculous to expect the vast majority of users in the world to start using 8 right away, especially if they’ve bought new computers within the past 1 or 2 years, or if they’re satisfied with how 7 or Vista (or whatever) works for them now. My family just bought a new computer a year and a half ago with 7 pre-installed, and it works just fine for us casual users. 
     Before my current computer (7 pre-installed), we used XP, and never bothered to upgrade to Vista.  Unless 8 is proven to be very good and a stabler version becomes available, we probably won’t be upgrading the OS, let alone buying a new computer (when we’ve just bought one less than 2 years ago). I feel these OS’s sometimes don’t live up to the hype, and I feel companies are putting too much pressure to upgrade ASAP (even if they don’t want to, or even if the OS is still supported). 
    I don’t expect to stay on the same OS forever (nobody ends up doing that, and we know support will be cut off after a certain number of years), but I’m not the kind to get a new OS every 2 or 3 years (regardless of the OS quality) just because Microsoft said so. And I’m not going to be buying new computers every 2 or 3 years either. . 

  • Dejas32

    I do not like Windows 8 at all. It’s not user friendly. 

  • Jnkmailhalt

    How many times can an author use the word “jarring” in one article?

  • DeeDeeMao

    Will it be a huge success? What differnce does it make? Microsoft doesn’t care if people like it of not. they’ll keep making each system obsolete so that people will have no choice but to buy the new ones.

    And they don’t want to listen to customer feedback so the “Improvements” they make to each new system are never based on what the end users really want anyway.

    Windows XP was the most user friendly system ever created. Whatever shortcomings there were could have been addressed while leaving the basic system unchanged. Give the end user a choice between a basic system with optional increased levels of complexity and “features” for the tehchno-geeks who care about such nonsense.

    I understand the the business strategy behind planned obsolescence. But I would be willing to pay an annual fee to be able to keep using One system forever that I know how to operate without having to learn a whole new song and dance routine along with all the dozens of secret handshakes and convoluted procedures requred to navigate my way through all the gimmickry of a new and “improved” system every 3 years.

  • ProGamerzStudios

    I still use wwindows xp xD

  • dirk

    i acctually like what windows 8 is giving runnig it from a slate

  • http://www.facebook.com/wbaldwin80 William Baldwin

    My laptop, the one I am on now is running Windows 7 Home Prem 64-bit. It is about 5 years old, a Dell Inspiron 1520, and works fine. Windows 8 beta slowed it down a LOT! Of course keyboard/mouse is horrible. At first, last year with the consumer preview, I actually had to google how to shut it off! My new computer I built last year is a mini-ITX HTPC running ubuntu 12.04 64-Bit and has a core i3 with 8GB of DDR3 ram and works perfect. No need for windows at all.

  • bo

    I like win 8 because I find it faster. since I also do Cad and design, I am stuck with Windows. I hope soon after they release it they give me the option of the metro screen or a clone of win7. Biggest pain with my dual boot system is that win8 changes all the hard drives, and then when I go back to win 7 they get changed back