A Simple Way Of Handling Spam With Gmail

I write for several sites around the ‘net. One of them is horrible for picking up spam. I can’t use the usual ways of hiding my address because of contact requirements, so I was changing Yahoo! addresses in the link about once a month to avoid the garbage buildup. I know there are all sorts of spam filters available for download, but the reason I use netmail to begin with is that I want to be completely independent from any specific computer. I could use POP3 and an e-mail client, either with an integrated filter (like Thunderbird) or with a separate one, but that would defeat the purpose of using Web-based e-mail to begin with.

When I moved all of my mail to Google a year or so ago, I decided to try out its spam filtering. I registered one Gmail address at the site in question, with mail to be forwarded from that account to my main Gmail account. Gmail’s filters work beautifully! I checked in this morning to look at a couple of archived messages (e-mail to that address is automatically archived, as well, so that I don’t have to sort it at the other address), and found 802 spam messages over the past 30 days. That’s not a lot, as spam goes (Fred Langa gets several times that many every day), but at roughly 28 a day from one site, it’s enough to be annoying. For the heck of it I browsed the list quickly, and saw nothing classed as spam that I might have wanted to look at.

If you’re dealing with lots of spam from addresses that you need to keep active, you might like to try this trick. Or just try Gmail in general. E-mail me and I’ll send you an invitation: eldergnomie @ gmail. com (without the spaces, of course).

BTW: Gmail now has several new features, including automatic virus scanning and the ability to read certain kinds of attachments in HTML instead of downloading them. Check out the new stuff at About Gmail.

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