Pica Pic Brings Back Memories of Yesteryear and Handheld Gaming

Some of my fondest memories of childhood were found in what today would be described as very primitive and simple handheld gaming devices that featured very basic LCD graphics and simple controls. These handheld games rarely had more than one background, and the objects and characters only had a limited number of spaces in which they could appear. This was handheld gaming at its most basic level, and I loved it.

Recently, Michael Stensen Sollien sent me a link to a site called Pica Pic, which brings back memories of yesteryear through digitized versions of classic handheld games from my youth. At first, I was impressed by the incredibly clean interface, but what really caught my eye was the incredible wide selection of handheld games to choose from. You don’t need to have an account, and each game can be played with a couple clicks of the mouse.

Pica Pic’s ever-expanding selection of games currently includes: Donkey Kong, Penguin Land, Parachute, Fishing Boy, Octopus, Caveman, Zelda, Plane and Tank, Bartman, Castle Adventure, Merry Cook, Pirate 777, Thief in Garden, Autoslalom, Space Bridge, Donkey Kong Jr., Terminator, Search Light, and more. Several of these games bring back fond memories of passing time attempting to avoid various bizarre obstacles that approached at breakneck speeds of one frame per second, and staying occupied during long road trips.

There isn’t much to say about the graphics, or any plot that games like these bring to the table. In fact, many of the games named after popular movies and television shows had very little if anything to do with the content they are based on.

Over all, these games are sure to bring back memories, especially if you’re a child of the same decades I grew up in. While Tetris remains one of my favorite (if not the favorite) games of all time, there will always be a warm place in my heart for these simple little LCD games that I spent so many hours playing in my youth.

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Chris has consistently expressed his convictions and visions outright, supplying practical information to targeted audiences: media agencies, business owners, technology consumers, software and hardware professionals, et al. He remains a passionate personality in the tech community-at-large. He's a geek.