Dog Training: Too Much Attention for the Dog

The problem of too much attention rarely is discussed in dog books. Most of the dog literature promotes spending time with your canine pal and developing a relationship. However, there are circumstances where your dog can receive too much attention, either in a temporary situation or in a permanent situation. The dog simply does not have any (or enough) time to itself. What you may see as a result is a wide range of symptoms from unusual aggression to self destructive licking. The situation causes the dog too much angst.

Although the dog is a pack animal, it does like to have time to itself. People who use a plastic kennel in the house will find that the dog uses this space as its private sanctuary. It is a place for the dog to retreat from the people and the activities of the household. The kennel affords the dog a den, within the house. The dog can consider the kennel as its own space. It is one of the many benefits of using a kennel.

One example of too much attention is a situation where the dog does not have much exposure to children. The dog may be fine with meeting a child on a walk and being petted. However, if this dog who only has occasional contact with kids suddenly finds itself with a many children visiting and wanting to play in the house, then it may be too much for the dog. Some dogs are fine with it. For other dogs, you will find your well adjusted pet hiding under the bed or finding some other sanctuary.

In situations where it is just you and the dog, the dog will tell you when it has had enough. Although the dog loves you dearly and is fiercely loyal, it may want some time alone. The dog does not need you on a constant basis. Take it as a sign of the dog self assuredness that it does want some time alone. And, if you develop (or have developed) your ‘dog reading’ skills, you will know when those times are.

Catherine Forsythe
Director of Operations
FlyingHamster: http://flyinghamster.com/

[tags]dogs, dog training, attention, kennel, sanctuary, dog aggression, catherine forsythe[/tags]