Exponential Growth

What were you doing in 1991?

I was a freight crew leader at a grocery store in Idaho. I lived with a great number of animals, but had never even heard of the of the personal computer. The last computer I’d worked with had been a Cray supercomputer in the basement of a federal agency in 1979. Punch cards and paper tape.

Meanwhile, at the Helsinki University, Linus Torvalds did have a personal computer, a 386, DX33 with 4 Megs of RAM, no co-processor and a 40 Meg hard disk. He also had a copy of a Unix operating system called Minix…which he was determined to improve upon.

That desire, just 13 years ago, to improve the Unix based Minix led directly to the Linux distribution I’m using right now. In a relatively short span of years, a new and powerful operating system has arisen to provide alternatives to businesses and home users world-wide. Consider this: all the members of Lockergnome forums have to be at least 13 years old. That means most every one of our 12,000+ members can recall a time when there was no Linux. Many can remember a life with no internet. Yet now it’s hard to believe how much the internet, and for some of us Linux, has come to be an important part of our everyday activities.

This is going to be a great time for Linux. It’s exponential growth will only continue. And we’d like to share that with you. That desire, just 13 years ago, to improve the Unix based Minix led directly to the Linux distribution I’m using right now. In a relatively short span of years, a new and powerful operating system has arisen to provide alternatives to businesses and home users world-wide. Consider this: all the members of Lockergnome forums have to be at least 13 years old. That means most every one of our 12,000+ members can recall a time when there was no Linux. Many can remember a life with no internet. Yet now it’s hard to believe how much the internet, and for some of us Linux, has come to be an important part of our everyday activities.

This year has seen the maturity of Linux. Several new distributions have been released, the kernal has had a major upgrade and several key components have also enjoyed major improvement. Linux is no longer a command line, geeks only operating system. Many distributions have a user interface and installation routine that would be familiar to any Windows user. And yet it’s carried it’s roots with it. You can easily set it up to run with only a command line, and it’s still possible to tweak every aspect of it from the kernal on out.

This is going to be a great time for Linux. It’s exponential growth will only continue. And we’d like to share that with you.