Post Longer Tweets from Tweetdeck with Deck.ly

Is 140 characters just never quite enough to convey the entire meaning of your Twitter messages? Worry no longer – Tweetdeck has unleashed Deck.ly, a service provided within Tweetdeck’s platform that allows Tweetdeck users to tweet to their heart’s content without character limits. Messages longer than 140 characters will be available for all Twitter users to read.

Tweetdeck users can compose tweets longer than 140 characters by upgrading the Android or Desktop versions of Tweetdeck,  or by accessing Tweetdeck via Chrome (iPhone and iPad upgrades are coming soon.) Tweetdeck users can then tweet beyond the 140 character limit using Deck.ly, which works by creating a special web page containing your full message – similar to services like Twitlonger. A short version of your tweet, plus a link to Deck.ly, is posted to Twitter. Anyone using the TweetDeck apps for Desktop, Chrome or Android will be able to read the full text of the message directly in the app. Anyone else will be taken to a FriendFeed-type page on Tweetdeck.com to read your extended tweet, or “Long Post,” where anyone can comment on your tweet using Disqus.

For TweetDeck desktop users, Deck.ly updates will be shown as double-height cells in a TweetDeckcolumn. If the text is longer than can be displayed in a double-height cell, there will be a “read more” link at the end of the tweet. Chrome users of Tweetdeck will see Deck.ly long updates as auto-expanded inline with no further clicks or popups required. Basically, they will appear just like normal tweets, only longer, and you can respond to them as you would any other tweet. Android users will see Deck.ly long indicated by a [...] icon in timeline view, but opening the detail view for one of these updates will show the full text. Like in the other apps, you can reply or retweet as normal.

But will other Tweetdeck users really want to see an entire blog post in Tweetdeck? A 318 character tweet – only about twice as long as usual – takes up nearly half of a column in Tweetdeck. I can safely say I will go crazy if every person I follow decides to abandon brevity entirely, and only moments after @jakeludington tested the function (above), his followers were already rejecting the concept, asking him to “never do that again.” Tweetdeck’s idea to integrate “long posts,” in an effort to build a larger and more devoted user base, could actually backfire entirely.

It is also important to note that, according to Tweetdeck’s blog, any message posted via Deck.ly will be publicly visible at the specific http://deck.ly address included in your tweet when it is posted to Twitter. There are NO private Deck.ly updates – so even if your account is protected, a Deck.ly tweet will be public.

Would you post or read longer tweets using Deck.ly in Tweetdeck? Or is Twitter best when used with brevity – in 140 characters or less, as it was designed?

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  • http://twitter.com/mitch_bartlett Mitch Bartlett

    People who post Tweets longer than 140 characters annoy the crap out of me. What they are saying usually isn’t worth an extra click. It’s an annoyance that should be banned from Twitter altogether.

  • http://twitter.com/mitch_bartlett Mitch Bartlett

    People who post Tweets longer than 140 characters annoy the crap out of me. What they are saying usually isn’t worth an extra click. It’s an annoyance that should be banned from Twitter altogether.

  • Anonymous

    I think longer Tweets kinda goes against the whole point of using Twitter. If you’re looking for some middle ground between a blog and Twitter, that’s what http://www.tumblr.com/ is for.

  • Anonymous

    sometyme we need to expand our tweet this so kool but it will some what boring and who is having that much tym to read the whole tweet of more than 140 .

  • http://twitter.com/Anasalikhan Anas

    sometyme we need to expand our tweet this so kool but it will some what boring and who is having that much tym to read the whole tweet of more than 140 .

  • http://www.google.com/profiles/mapaul Mike

    Tweets are limited to 140 chars for a reason. SMS only allows 160 per message, and Twitter reserves the first 20 for the username. Services like this will put those who can only use twitter on their mobiles via SMS at a disadvantage.

  • http://www.google.com/profiles/mapaul Mike

    Tweets are limited to 140 chars for a reason. SMS only allows 160 per message, and Twitter reserves the first 20 for the username. Services like this will put those who can only use twitter on their mobiles via SMS at a disadvantage.

  • P Bennett2243

    So what I gather from all the comments here; if you have sonething longer to say that won’t fit on twitter then write it in a blog on blogger, tumblr etc.

  • http://neonenigma.com neonguru

    Which 1Pass are you referring to? A search brings up a number of options.

  • http://www.falgram.com Falmung

    1pass? First time I hear of it.

  • kevin sexton

    they don’t want to sell residential internet service to people uploading, but providers have gone to 10:1 ratio or higher, the slow upload means slower download in some cases due to requests going out slower. They want people doing streaming etc to buy high priced business class service, even though the up bandwidth is there behind the modem being wasted.

  • http://about.me/kevin.mark Kevin Mark

    Exactly. It’s purely for monetary gain. They don’t truly care about the performance of the service.