Facebook Begins to Slowly Invite More Users to Upgrade Facebook Messages

If you’re waiting for your @facebook.com email address, don’t hold your breath.

The upgraded Facebook Messages will be offered to only a “majority” of the more than 500 million Facebook users over the next two months. The remainder of Facebook users will have to wait even longer.

In the Silicon Valley Mercury News, Andrew Bosworth, who leads development of the new Facebook Messages, said “[t]he reason we’re taking our time with it is we’re not starting from scratch. We’re starting from being one of the top messaging systems on the Internet. This is a new product with 500 million existing users.”

The upgraded Facebook Messages was announced in November 2010. Facebook has since been providing relatively few people access to the new product, with these initial users able to “invite” their friends to upgrade to Facebook Messages. According the Silicon Valley Mercury News, Facebook has been moving existing Facebook messages over to the new service slowly over the past two months, and Facebook has been checking every character within every message, scanning for discrepancies. Facebook has also assigned an engineer to manually check every error it discovers.

The upgraded Facebook Messages treats every communication between users on Facebook as part of an ongoing conversation that began with their first interaction on Facebook – a history that can, in some cases, date back several years.

“We have billions of messages in the existing system that we have to move over to the new system,” Bosworth said. “These are intensely meaningful, personal messages that people expect to have access to, and we have to do this with some care.”

Facebook notes in the Mercury News that it is working on offering Facebook Messages to more users, including users outside of the United States. Facebook also admits the upgrades moved a little slow over the holidays, which is when it appears Facebook Messages first launched to a select group of users. According to a Facebook spokeswoman, the team is now “really starting to move on the invites.”

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  • http://RossMcNeil.com Ross McNeil

    Makes me feel privileged to have the messages system now. Although, the upgrade isn’t that special.

  • Anonymous

    Makes me feel privileged to have the messages system now. Although, the upgrade isn’t that special.

  • Anonymous

    I have the new messages and i’m in Canada

  • Anonymous

    I have the new messages and i’m in Canada

  • http://sunnyis.me/ Sunny Singh

    The upgrade’s nice, I haven’t really utilized my Facebook email address though. But hey, it works.

  • http://www.myunv.com/ Sunny Singh

    The upgrade’s nice, I haven’t really utilized my Facebook email address though. But hey, it works.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1068818783 Tim Kissane

    The truth is that Linux systems are much harder to compromise than Mac or Windows. Google “Pwn2Own” for an example. Given the incentive of prize money, hackers were invited to attack all three OSes. Mac fell first, then Windows. Linux remained secure.

  • alex silva

    I own a computer repair business myself and seriously you have to be honest most computer users do not actually do smart things while they are online. Probably 50 to 75 percent of my clients come in because of massive viral infection even after I tell them the things to watch out for. You have to be honest here the average end user is probably more interested in looking up porn than actually worrying about not getting a virus. I have removed viruses from almost every Windows PC I have fixed. I have had to removed viruses from Mac as well but I have never had to remove a virus from a Linux box. I have run probably every OS at one point or another and in computer school I was training on probably 7 different OS systems. I found that the schools network constantly got viruses, being a computer school that isn’t surprising at all but what is more surprising is that the Linux networks never went down because of a virus. Linux has it’s issues but usually it is related to not being able to run a program because it needs another program to run. I tell any of my clients worried about security or viruses that they should consider a Linux system. Systems like MINT linux and Ubuntu linux are getting to be very user friendly. The interface on MINT is very Windwos like. Obviously it has it’s differences being a linux and all. Even the installs are getting more end user friendly, MINT Linux install all you have to do is put the cd in the drive and boot from the cd and it brings up a desktop and you click on install to hard drive. It is that easy. Ubuntu has a Windows based installer you can use right from Windows but the menu system of Ubuntu leaves something to be desired. Seriously though you can’t expect the general population to ever learn from their mistakes especially most end users. If all people had common sense I probably would not have a job.

  • alex silva

    I forgot to say,
    When I ran Windows and Mac I needed an antivirus.
    Since I switched to Linux I don’t use any antivirus and never have needed one since I switched.

    I am root

    • http://www.facebook.com/LeeWoody Lee Wood

      Watching Porn usually means you need a good AV!
      :o)

  • http://www.facebook.com/LeeWoody Lee Wood

    The mac might not have the userbase of Windows, however its becoming the most attractive target… Why? Because 80% of Windows users update windows, and their browser on a regular basis, aswell as their AV software… The last 20% are probably already infected…

    How many Mac users have AV software installed? Less than 5% according to official figures, I have two macs, neither of which have any AV installed.

  • http://profiles.google.com/rahul247rocks Rahul Ghosh

    thanks for sharing the info

  • http://about.me/jaowens Jordan Owens

    You don’t need one!!!!!!!!!

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1657023007 Justin Andrew Hansen

    If you own a Mac right now, I gaurentee that if you use your head, you wont need to care about viruses. If the Mac gains great marketshare over the next few years, then yeah I would consider an antivirus then.