Verizon Pay as You Go Internet

Sometimes, you don’t want to throw down a considerably high amount of money every month on the off chance that you’ll actually need Internet on the go. For some, this is a necessity that comes on rare occasion during travel. So, what do you do when you need wireless Internet service and you don’t want to commit to a plan?

Back in 2009, Verizon announced a mobile broadband plan that remains one of the more popular pay as you go wireless Internet services today. Here’s how it breaks down.

Verizon Pay as You Go InternetFor tablet/netbook users:

  • 2 GB — $30.00/month
  • 5 GB — $50.00/month
  • 10 GB — $80.00/month

USB modems and dedicated mobile hotspots have different prices:

  • 100 MB of data for 1 day — $15
  • 300 MB of data for 7 days — $30
  • 1 GB of data for 30 days — $50
  • 5 GB of data for 30 days — $80

Obviously, these prices are significantly higher than the contract price, and for good reason. Verizon wants you to lock in that contract, making these plans only truly worthwhile if you’re rarely in need of them.

No activation costs, reconnection fees, or overage charges are applied to prepaid accounts. Tablet plans are only available on supported models.

Verizon may not be the cheapest prepaid carrier out there. Cricket certainly drives a hard bargain at $65 for 30 days and 7.5 GB of service, with both carriers requiring the user to purchase a roughly $150 mobile hotspot (cheaper with contract) in order to use the service in the first place.

Mobile phone users get a much more appealing prepaid deal. At $50 per month, basic phones receive unlimited talk, texting, and data. Smart phone users can pay $30 for a month of unlimited data or $0.99 per day of use for a 24-hour period.

Whether Verizon is your preferred carrier or not, it’s always a good idea to keep in mind what local prepaid rates are in the area where you’re traveling. Being caught with an extremely high phone bill at the end of the month because you crossed a border into a country that’s not covered in your plan is a bummer. Being able to pick up a prepaid phone or mobile hotspot and use it for the duration without committing to an expensive two-year contract could be the best way to save money when you’re away from home.

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Ryan Matthew Pierson has worked as a broadcaster, writer, and producer for media outlets ranging from local radio stations to internationally syndicated programs. His experience includes every aspect of media production. He has over a decade of experience in terrestrial radio, Internet multimedia, and commercial video production.