SeaWeb Applauds US Decision To Support Bluefin Tuna Trade Protection

There should be an image here!SeaWeb applauded the announcement by the United States that it will support a proposed international trade ban for endangered bluefin tuna, and the ocean conservation organization called for international support for 32 species of red and pink coral as well as for eight shark species proposed for similar protection. These unique and valued marine species will be the focus of the upcoming Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) Conference of Parties (CoP15), in Doha, Qatar, March 13 to 25.

SeaWeb’s Too Precious To Wear campaign raises awareness of the threats posed to coral by the international trade. Red and pink coral (scientific name: Coralliidae) are widely used in jewelry and home décor but are among the least protected of all coral species.

“SeaWeb applauds the United States for its strong support of trade protection for bluefin tuna, and for its leadership in proposing six species of sharks and red and pink coral for CITES protection,” said Kristian Teleki, who is SeaWeb’s vice president for science initiatives and based in London. “The Doha meeting represents a unique opportunity for meaningful trade measures to be put in place for these valuable marine species.”

Scientists, conservationists, jewelers and designers are urging countries to protect red and pink corals, calling the Qatar meeting the last chance for these long-lived, slow-growing species to receive international trade protection. Red and pink coral are a type of deep-sea precious coral found in the Mediterranean and Pacific. Between 30 and 50 metric tons of these corals are taken from the ocean annually to meet consumer demand for jewelry and decorative items. The United States alone imported 28 million pieces of red and pink coral between 2001 and 2008. A finished red coral necklace can retail for hundreds of thousands of dollars. Jewelry retailer Tiffany & Co., designer Temple St. Clair, ocean conservationist Céline Cousteau and many others are in support of the United States and European Union’s proposal to protect red and pink coral under Appendix II of CITES.

“Overfishing of red and pink coral has put these animals—precious jewels of the sea—at great risk,” said Teleki. “A CITES Appendix II listing for Coralliidae can help safeguard these species as well as the future of the industries and people that depend on them.”

The global wildlife trade is immense, highly valuable and is often a threat to global conservation efforts. Thousands of species are traded every year, with an estimated value of US$160 billion. Illegal trade in wildlife products is estimated at US$10 to US$20 billion. Scientists estimate that because of trade, loss of habitat and other environmental changes, species are becoming extinct 1,000 times faster than a natural rate. The United Nations has declared 2010 the International Year of Biodiversity, and protection for many species under CITES is needed to protect diversity, livelihoods and ecosystems around the world.

Julia Roberson @ SeaWeb

[Photo above by Kathy Tang / CC BY-ND 2.0]

[awsbullet:bluefin tuna]

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  • Anonymous

    As you said, at the $350 – $500 price point, you are getting close to an entry-level laptop and certainly at the higher level, you could get an iPad, which also does email, web, lots of apps, and has instant-on.

    The sweet-spot is $250 and unless the manufacturers can make money at that price, the chromebook will not fly.

    • http://chris.pirillo.com/ Chris Pirillo

      It’s going to be tough.

  • http://eddieringle.com Eddie Ringle

    I doubt many people will actually buy a Chromebook, anyway. I’m more interested in the option to rent them from Google for a relatively cheap price. Basically paying in small monthly payments instead of paying up front, and then getting an upgraded Chromebook in a year or two once your rent has covered the cost of the one you already have.

    • http://chris.pirillo.com/ Chris Pirillo

      Yeah, I think the “rental” model is potentially explosive for older generations.

  • Anonymous

    Uh, no. To be honest, Google seems to be good at two things:

    1. Making web/cloud based products that are free, but require the barter of your privacy so they can profit from it. And
    2. Convincing people to spend a lot of money for the privilege to be a “Beta Tester” for them.

    I could wrong, but Chromebook sounds like yet another half-baked product where the hype doesn’t fit the reality.

    Now, the iPad 2 : Okay, that product could do in the PC industry.

    Sent from my iPad

  • http://twitter.com/timothydaniels Tim Daniels

    One of the primary functions of my computer is to run Quickbooks. Will the Chromebooks not load or run Windows-based programs?
    Assuming that is the case, Google will have to offer programs with the same functionality (including a vastly improved version of Google Docs) before I’d be willing to abandon the traditional PC.

    • Anonymous

      Google Chrome OS is a Linux operating system.

  • http://www.youtube.com/lanech Lane Chaplin

    They should definitely price these at or around $250 if this is going to work. I have a Cr-48, too, but I believe that you actually marginalize people when you put it at a higher price because a low price point is primarily what is going to get people thinking “I can live basically on the web.” Otherwise, you can just get a laptop that does all the same things for the same price, and people have no inclination to think “what can I live with and without with a laptop?” If this project tanks, it isn’t going to be because the OS is lacking. It will be because the price point is way more than a reasonable person will pay.

  • Michael Wagner

    As we all know, products get discounted (especially by Amazon). I’m quite sure both Acer and Samsung Chromebooks will get the usual disconting

  • http://www.myunv.com/ Sunny Singh

    The Chromebook is actually pretty nice and a great idea. The average user wants to get on the Internet and that’s it. With Google’s online services, it’s even easier to switch over desktop applications like word processing or spreadsheet creation to Google Docs. You can even store all your files online with Flickr, YouTube, Dropbox, etc.

    However, as you pointed out, the pricing will definitely be a problem. Why pay for at least $349 device that can only do the web?

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001248720132 Bryan Miner

    I think their price point is good enough, they are offering different models and ones with or without 3G connection. If people want the features these have they will get them over a “full computer” I think the rent option will be utilized a lot more than buying them. College students will love this.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1348879216 Seth Hoogeboom

    I don’t think that the $350-500 price for the Chromebooks is too expensive, I think it’s just right.

  • Viktor Benei

    I don’t get it. What can it do, what my Win7 or Mac can not? Why should I switch? Almost every people who wants to connect to internet already does, with a Windows, Mac, or Linux based notebook. Why would anybody switch to a new system which can only do less?

    Btw I’m a fan of Google, I just don’t feel like I should abandon my Win7 / Mac for a less capable OS.

  • Anonymous

    This is a great article Chris. I’m certainly looking forward to the release of this light weight. But, I as well as you, are a little weary of the $349 price tag. Yes, I agree, it would have it’s place on trips and such, but much has yet to be undiscovered.

  • Anonymous

    This is a great article Chris. I’m certainly looking forward to the release of this light weight. But, I as well as you, are a little weary of the $349 price tag. Yes, I agree, it would have it’s place on trips and such, but much has yet to be undiscovered.

  • http://twitter.com/mavalos88 Mauricio Avalos

    I agree. The price point is a bit too high in my opinion but i’d need to try and use the laptop first. Maybe the whole experience the device brings will be worth the extra money.
    I feel it’s like my Mac book air. I was willing to pay extra money for the light weight of the product and it’s almost “instant on” feature.
    I could have gotten a way better laptop for what the air cost me but for me those features were worth it. Maybe the same principle holds true for a chromebook?

  • http://twitter.com/mavalos88 Mauricio Avalos

    I agree. The price point is a bit too high in my opinion but i’d need to try and use the laptop first. Maybe the whole experience the device brings will be worth the extra money.
    I feel it’s like my Mac book air. I was willing to pay extra money for the light weight of the product and it’s almost “instant on” feature.
    I could have gotten a way better laptop for what the air cost me but for me those features were worth it. Maybe the same principle holds true for a chromebook?

  • http://www.facebook.com/danielteague24 Daniel Aaron Teague

    yes the simple fact is right now in this economy it will people will buy cheaper or even used laptops you can always wipe the hard drive and put ubuntu on it my dell desktop 3100 used i wiped it and put ubuntu on it works and dose everything i need it to do 100$ for the ubuntu free.