How to Stop Animated GIFs in Google Chrome

Google+, unless it stops supporting animated GIFs before its official launch, may bring about a sort of second coming for animated GIFs on the Web. Unfortunately, not everyone cares to see these short animated images pop up on their screen every time someone shares a popular post going around. Thankfully, there are some very easy ways to put the brakes on this annoyance using Google Chrome extensions.

The first one is simply called Stop Animations, which allows you to stop all animated GIFs on a page by simply pressing the [esc] key. You can resume animations and send the dancing hamsters on their merry way by hitting the [esc] key one more time.

Another extension goes by the name Pause! Pause! Pause! and it works by automatically pausing animations as they appear on your screen. You can choose to activate them by clicking the mouse cursor over the GIF. You can tell an image is animated by the Not Allowed styled cursor that appears.

The third extension goes by the simple title Paused. This extension is a fork of Pause! Pause! Pause! and it carries an identical functionality. According to some reviews and comments from the developer, Paused corrects CPU load issues present in earlier versions of its parent project. At this present time, both of these extensions appear to be working just fine, and it’s just a matter of picking which one you like the best.

These three extensions can help bring sanity to back to your Web browsing experience and let you never again have to relive the early days of the Internet when animated GIFs and other similar image files were the norm. While many of us wish that these annoyances were buried with GeoCities, it appears that is not the will of the Web. For that reason, extensions like these will continue to come in handy.

Article Written by

Ryan Matthew Pierson has worked as a broadcaster, writer, and producer for media outlets ranging from local radio stations to internationally syndicated programs. His experience includes every aspect of media production. He has over a decade of experience in terrestrial radio, Internet multimedia, and commercial video production.

  • http://about.me/sandmaxprime Lionel Faleiro

    I normally:

    1. Download and play the demo – If I like it, I will keep it on a Too Buy List.
    2. Purchase Later – If the game has released, has gotten good reviews and impressed me in the demo, I will keep it aside and buy it Later. This tactic is especially useful for console games because after 3 months, the games get released as platinum releases where their prices are 50% of the price when it was first launched