How to Go from HDMI to Component in the 21st Century

How to Go from HDMI to Component in the 21st CenturyTroy Hogan writes:

Hi, guys!

I came across your YouTube post, How to Go from HDMI to Component, in my search to solve this problem.

While in the video you ask the question about why you would want to do this and talk about older TVs. I am in this situation because I finally upgraded to an HDTV. My stereo is an older Sony and I want to use it for A/V switching and it only supports component and optical switching with no HDMIs. While I would like to upgrade my stereo to a new unit, preferably a Sony ES series receiver, I just don’t want to pay for it.

So I went about wiring up my new TV and cable through the stereo via component and optical cables, and poof: it worked! While I get no real HD from my Sony Blu-ray, I do get way better sound. While DTS was a rarity on DVD, it seems to be a Blu-ray standard.

After spending an hour and half on the phone with Sony, the second guy up the chain came on and explained that it won’t work due to copy protection. You mention HDCP for copy protection.

Prior to the advent of HDMI, component was the way you carried HDTV and coaxial or optic audio cables for Dolby digital audio. What I am trying to do today would have been very common five years ago and probably the only way 8-10 years ago.

Now I am back to reconsidering a stereo upgrade or finding a way to go from HDMI to component. I have no interest in copying Blu-rays; I just want to get the most out the equipment I have and I am getting screwed by Sony.

I have a lot of Sony equipment; I am frustrated by the complications I am experiencing, many of which are brought on by Sony. I understand this is not all due to Sony, but it has a large stake in Blu-ray, HD, and recorded media, so it is largely to blame with much to gain over all of these issues.

The new HD standard has been watered down to 720p as well as over-complicated. While HD is today’s standard and I have a TV with an HD digital tuner, I can’t even get cable without a box. Since the legislature mandated us to go to HD, the industry should have been required to get us on an HD system with the compatibility and functionality of our analog TVs and VCRs. Once we had cable-ready TVs, we could screw in the coax, and poof: we had lots of channels without additional equipment (unless we wanted premium services, and even some systems used caps so you still did not need a box). We could buy VCRs and record our own shows and movies. We didn’t have to rent recording equipment (DVRs) from our TV service providers; we bought them at the store.

Now my cable company charges me for an HD box to get HD programming, which is today’s standard — and then it rarely provides the best signal. Many network programs are broadcast in HD with some form of digital surround. The cable company rarely — if ever — broadcasts the better audio, just the crappy right/left audio.

At this point I am annoyed enough to just try and beat the system by getting around HDCP so I can watch 1080i movies through component cables on the equipment I already have. So is there any chance you would recommend an HDMI-to-component converter that would allow me to do this? I also see HDMI-to-component cables, but doubt these would work in my situation.

Image: Monoprice HDMI to Component (YPbPr) & R/L Stereo Audio Converter by Amazon

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