Stardock Corporation Announces Multiplicity

Control multiple computers from a single keyboard and mouse.

Software developer Stardock Corporation announced a brand new product called Multiplicity, a program that allows users to control multiple computers with a single keyboard and mouse. For users, it’s much like using a multiple-monitor setup – when the user moves his mouse to a monitor connected to a different PC, the user is then controlling that computer. It is not a remote control solution.

A typical configuration would be two or three computers, each with its own monitor connected to that computer. The primary computer would have the keyboard and mouse hooked up to it. The secondary computers receive input via a network connection about the mouse’s location. When the mouse passes onto their screen, the user is in control of that PC.

“It’s totally seamless,” said Brad Wardell, Product Manager of Multiplicity. “I can be playing a full screen game on one screen and have an instant messaging conversation going on the other computer. I just move my mouse over to the other monitor to type a response and then move it back to continue controlling my character in the game I’m playing.”

Multiplicity also provides a universal clipboard between machines. Users can copy images or text from one machine, move their mouse over to another monitor, and paste it. The Pro version of Multiplicity allows users to also copy and paste files and directories between machines.

Stardock plans to target engineering firms, testing centers, power users, gamers, and other markets that tend to have people that may have multiple computers.

“If you’ve ever sent yourself an e-mail to move a file or piece of data in the same room then you need Multiplicity,” said Wardell. “If you are currently in an office where there’s keyboard and mice taking over your desk or table, you need Multiplicity.”

Multiplicity will come in two forms, standard and professional. Multiplicity standard version will list for $39.95 and supports controlling two computers. Multiplicity Pro will list for $69.95, which supports controlling up to any number of computers as well as supports copying files and folders between machines.

Stardock expects to release Multiplicity by the end of February.

Article Written by

  • http://twitter.com/KodeSource Doug McFarlane

    Sending out the request takes bandwidth, ie: ‘Is the next letter an ‘A’?’.

    But if both sides use an agreed upon question and response algorithm, then the sender only needs to send the responses from the algorithm, based on English language patterns.

    If your ‘2 bits’ per letter is accurate, and normal English takes say a minimum of 5 bits (2^5 = 32 unique characters), that is quite a savings.

    Although text is known for its high compression rate anyways, so I’m not sure if this saves space overall, but again, an interesting read.