At Least One Region Is Safe From Surprise Uploads

This must be good news, right? Not being responsible for illegal uploads when your connection happens to be the source in Germany. But here in the States, things not quite as fancy free from what I have heard. In some locations, there has been news of people being held outwardly responsible for securing their connection as they are the one that shows up on the bill at the end of the month.

Honestly, it’s a tough sell either way as far as I am concerned. On the one hand, it is not fair to be held responsible for something that you did not actually do. But on the other hand, should we not be taking responsibility for our own Internet connections? I certainly cannot speak for everyone, but I believe that it is insane not to have routers request outwardly to use a WPA encryption during the setup. Routers I have used make it available, but they fail to explain its importance.

What do you think? Should we begin seeing more responsibility on the end users despite the obvious fact that routers are not making securing one’s network a big deal during setup? Hit the comments, tell me your thoughts.

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  • grannar olice

    The situation is most people are not technical enough to deal with past or present threats, and many more don’t choose to bother [I just use the computer to get work done, what is all this?]. Then there are the legions of those who refuse/neglecf/forget to do what they are asked or demanded to do. Then we must realize the threats are evolving quite robustly.

    “In some locations, there has been news of people being held outwardly responsible for securing their connection as they are the one that shows up on the bill at the end of the month.”
    I would like to see some evidence of this [links?]: I read a threatening article on the subject several years ago and since then seen *nada*. People have also floated ideas like imposing viral downloads to update people’s computers, but that falls on the same problem of violation of user freedom. which is flouted by malware vectors.

    Perhaps the “best” way to “take responsibility” for keeping your computer free from bot attack would be to chuck Windoz for Linux. You would still have to keep the system and apps updated, but your Vista [or even] XP SP3 slug of a computer would likely seem much more responsive. How many will go this route?