Switching from Android to iOS: Helpful Tips

Switching from Android to iOS: Helpful TipsIf you’re a long-time Android user considering making the switch to iOS, there are some thing you can do to make the process a little easier. We received email recently from one of our readers asking some questions regarding the process of making the switch.

Bottom line: Both of these platforms offer a lot of similar capabilities. There isn’t much you can do on one that you can’t do on the other. While the code base is different, most of the apps are basically the same.

So here are some tips for anyone making the switch from Android to iOS.

Sync Google Contacts and Calendar to Your iOS Device

Just because you’re on iOS doesn’t mean you’re stuck with just using Apple calendars and contacts. You can actually sync these services with Google and continue using your Google account as your primary calendar. Not only does Google provide apps for immediate access to this information, but iOS enables you to set up an automatic sync through the settings menu.

Just add Gmail as an email account and set up sync. Your contacts can be easily synced using CardDAV.

Most of the Apps Are Available on Both Platforms

Take a moment to inventory the apps you’ve purchased and downloaded from Google Play. Many of them are also available on iOS. You may have to repurchase the paid apps, but you won’t be left in the dark entirely. As with any major platform, the amount of impact the switch has on you financially depends greatly on how much you’ve invested in an individual platform.

For apps that don’t exist across different platforms, a quick Google search for an alternative to a popular app will often reveal several excellent options for you.

Most mainstream app developers today offer their software across multiple mobile platforms. Just check out the developer’s site and look for the iTunes App Store logo.

Sync to iCloud

Believe it or not, you no longer need to use iTunes at all with an iPhone. In fact, many users opt not to have iTunes installed on their PC for this very reason. Set up iCloud sync and take advantage of Apple’s cloud storage (iCloud) to sync just about anything you want to keep on your device.

If you have a lot of media that you wish to sync to your phone from iTunes, you can still do it wirelessly by simply putting the iPhone on the same network as your PC. Syncing over Wi-Fi is done practically automatically and generally has very little problems.

You will need to create an Apple ID for this, though this can be done with your existing email address.

Get Used to It

Just like iPhone users getting used to Android, iOS takes time to get accustomed to. Things are done a little differently on iOS, and you’ll be saying goodbye to widgets and other perks of the platform. What you gain, however, is a platform that receives regular updates that are consistent across every carrier. iOS is also (and I know someone will disagree with me) more stable than Android in many ways. This is a key advantage to having the hardware and software developed and supported by one company. App developers know exactly what hardware they’re optimizing their software for, too.

Play around with Siri and give yourself a month to adjust to the changes. What might appear to be limited at first can actually be fairly liberating once you understand why things are done the way they are on iOS.

Should You Jailbreak?

Jailbreaking on iOS can cause a number of things to happen, but jailbreaking communities have made serious advances in making sure the act of jailbreaking doesn’t cause undo harm to your phone. Like rooting on Android, iOS can become a bit more customizable once it has been jailbroken. Just be advised that Apple does not support the activity and you’re on your own if your phone is bricked.

I recommend giving yourself a month with a vanilla version of iOS before jailbreaking just to see if you can get by without it.

These are my tips for switchers. What are yours?

Image of Google Android logo dressed as an Apple one shared by Tsahi Levent-Levi

Article Written by

Ryan Matthew Pierson has worked as a broadcaster, writer, and producer for media outlets ranging from local radio stations to internationally syndicated programs. His experience includes every aspect of media production. He has over a decade of experience in terrestrial radio, Internet multimedia, and commercial video production.

  • http://twitter.com/YamanKaytaz Yaman Kaytaz

    Welcome to iOS :)

  • http://j.mp/slayerXcore Josh K (SlayerXcore)

    1 comment, iOS itself may be more stable due to hardware and software being made by the same manufacture, However stock android on a Nexus device is just as stable as google maintains that device itself (mostly). Non Nexus Devices have carrier and OEM additions and tweaks that can cause a few glitches here and there. Also Android apps tend to be more stable overall, whereas iOS apps that aren’t as popular become stagnate and cause significant crashes after an iOS update as shown here http://www.forbes.com/sites/tomiogeron/2012/02/02/does-ios-crash-more-than-android-a-data-dive/ .

  • Sid Scheck

    Thanks.