Samsung Vs. Acer Chromebook: Which One Should You Buy?

Samsung Vs. Acer Chromebook: Which One Should You Buy?When it comes to the Google Chromebook, I would consider myself a semi-expert. I was one of the fortunate few who received the original Chromebook from Google for testing, called the Cr-48. Since the introduction of the final product, I have sat on the sidelines, waiting for the price of the Chromebook to reach a price point that all of those who used the Cr-48 agreed upon. The price point was between $200 and $250, which has finally arrived.

For those of you who are not familiar with the Chrome operating system, Google has evolved the OS from a simple browser experience into what now is more Android-like. Google has, over the past several years, changed, fixed, updated, revamped, and vastly improved on the user experience. The beautiful part about what Google is doing is that the company provides these updates for free.

During the past month, there have been two new Chromebooks introduced: one model from Samsung and another from Acer, and they share some commonality. Both come with a free 100 GB of Google Drive Cloud Storage for two years plus 12 free sessions of GoGO Inflight Internet offered by various airlines. Chris made an excellent observation in that these two freebies themselves just about pay for the cost of either of these two Chromebooks.

In addition, both the Samsung and Acer models have similar processors, the same amount of RAM, similar connectors including USB, HDMI, and VGA outputs, SD card readers, the same display resolution, and similar size and weight (Acer’s is half a pound heavier). However, the similarities end here and the Samsung model offers additional features.

The Samsung version is priced at $249 and the Acer at $199, but you get a better-featured unit from Samsung. The Samsung offers Bluetooth capabilities, comes with an SSD hard drive (Acer has a 320 GB ATA hard disk), and the biggest difference is in battery life. The Samsung offers 6.5 hours of battery power while the Acer offers just 4 hours of battery power. For those air warriors among you who plan on spending any time at the airport, that 2.5 hours could be critical if you need to complete an important work assignment or even when you are trying to complete the next level of Angry Birds.

Because of these differences, I believe that the Samsung Chromebook offers more value and performance features and is definitely worth the additional $50.

What do you think?

Comments are welcome.

Source: Google, Acer
Source: Google, Samsung

Article Written by

I have been writing for LockerGnome since relocating to Missouri seven years ago, where I continue to be a technology enthusiast who enjoys playing with the newest and latest gadgets.

  • http://twitter.com/912doctorwho Joseph Bishop

    Looking at the Samsung the bottom half looks very much like a MacBook Air. Samsung been doing more copying eh.

  • dwick_OR

    Rather than Acer vs Samsung, I think an article on why one should buy a Chromebook at all would be a better first step here.

    • NoelEmerald

      In fairness, Chris does give a few reasons why one might want one in his video review of the Samsung. My dad pretty much only uses his 17″ Dell Studio to search the web and read emails, he does all his work at the office, so it seems overkill to have the laptop that he has.

      My biggest wonder though, is what made Acer think that a Chromebook needed a 320GB HDD! Cost, perhaps. But for only $50 more the Samsung is much more tempting, even if the Acer does have a nicer design.

  • http://twitter.com/bob3160 Bob Gostischa

    Thanks Ron,
    As a CR-48 user and owner, I’ve been looking for an upgrade and Samsung’s unit looks like what I’ve been hoping for.
    This isn’t meant to take the place of your laptop but its sure better than anything currently available if your needs are strictly internet related.

  • http://twitter.com/Gallifrey103 Alexander_Sigsworth#

    I’m not the kind of person who would take my Chromebook with me, as I’d be using it for its lack of features I don’t need, so the extra battery life doesn’t really matter to me.

  • http://twitter.com/Gallifrey103 Alexander_Sigsworth#

    I’m not the kind of person who would take my Chromebook with me, as I’d be using it for its lack of features I don’t need, so the extra battery life doesn’t really matter to me.

  • http://twitter.com/Gallifrey103 Alexander_Sigsworth#

    I’m not the kind of person who would take my Chromebook with me, as I’d be using it for its lack of features I don’t need, so the extra battery life doesn’t really matter to me.

  • http://twitter.com/mjsiebolt MJ Siebolt

    okay fellow techies Why should I leave my mac and windows os computers if I cannot do things off line and not have the control of it like Mac OS and Windows

    • wetware.

      you can do things offline on chrome os.

  • art

    I was looking for a cheap laptop that I could primarly use for schoolwork, web surfing videos etc. my only question is would i be able to create a powerpoint with this or type up a book report. I don’t really know to much about google docs.

  • ooo

    would this be a sutible computer for writing a book report or making a powerpoint for school? I don’t really know to much about google docs.

    • Gerald Coleman

      absolutely, I’ve just used Google Slides to make a presentation and it transferred over to powerpoint without any issues. Also, the cloud print feature is a plus as well.

    • Gerald Coleman

      absolutely, I’ve just used Google Slides to make a presentation and it transferred over to powerpoint without any issues. Also, the cloud print feature is a plus as well.