Toddlers Appreciate Good Intentions

Researchers at Queen’s University have discovered that toddlers as young as 21 months appreciate good intentions, and will do their best to reward the efforts of people who try to help them.

Psychology professor Valerie Kuhlmeier and PhD student Kristen Dunfield found that toddlers …continue reading

The Emerging Science Of Molecular Gastronomy

A new and relatively little-known scientific discipline called molecular gastronomy has quietly revolutionized the dining experience in some famous restaurants and promises to foster a wider revolution in other restaurant and home kitchens. That’s the conclusion of an article in ACS’ Chemical Reviews, a …continue reading

New Survey Techniques Improve Narwhal Population Estimates

Improvements in aerial survey methods have led to increased estimates of narwhal populations in the eastern Arctic, according to a paper published Arctic, the journal of the University of Calgary’s Arctic Institute of North America.

Previous estimates of narwhals were based on surface counts …continue reading

SLU Doctor Warns Against St. John's Wort For Anxiety

In a broad-based review of studies focused on drugs that treat anxiety, a Saint Louis University doctor found no evidence supporting the use of so-called “natural” treatments in combating the effects of anxiety.

St. John’s wort, kava extract and valerian, herbal remedies touted on …continue reading

Commercial Fishing Estimated To Kill Millions Of Sea Turtles

The number of sea turtles inadvertently snared by commercial fishing gear over the past 20 years may reach into the millions, according to the first peer-reviewed study to compile sea turtle bycatch data from gillnet, trawl and longline fisheries worldwide.

The study, which was …continue reading

Dig Looks At Society Just Before Dawn Of Urban Civilization In The Middle East

Thirty-one acres in extent, Tell Zeidan is situated where the Balikh River joins the Euphrates River in modern-day Syria. The location was at the crossroads of major trade routes across ancient Mesopotamia that followed the course of the Euphrates River valley.

Stein said Tell …continue reading

Far-Flung Pine Pollen Still Potent Miles From The Tree

When forest biologist Claire Williams boards ferries bound for North Carolina’s Outer Banks, the barrier islands that line the NC coast, ferry captains call her the “Pollen Lady.”

Each spring from 2006 to 2009, Williams traveled back and forth from the islands to the …continue reading

Traces Of Early Native Americans – In Sunflower Genes

New information about early Native Americans’ horticultural practices comes not from hieroglyphs or other artifacts, but from a suite of four gene duplicates found in wild and domesticated sunflowers.

In an upcoming issue of Current Biology, Indiana University Bloomington biologists present the first concrete …continue reading

Mental Health Providers Should Prescribe Exercise More Often For Depression, Anxiety

Exercise is a magic drug for many people with depression and anxiety disorders, and it should be more widely prescribed by mental health care providers, according to researchers who analyzed the results of numerous published studies.

“Exercise has been shown to have tremendous benefits …continue reading

Scientists Find New, Inexpensive Way To Predict Alzheimer's Disease

Your brain’s capacity for information is a reliable predictor of Alzheimer’s disease and can be cheaply and easily tested, according to scientists.

“We have developed a low-cost behavioral assessment that can clue someone in to Alzheimer’s disease at its earliest stage,” said Michael Wenger, …continue reading