Has Microsoft Waited Too Long to Join the Tablet Craze?

For those of you who have had the opportunity to try the new Windows 8, with its slick Metro GUI, you are aware that this system has the strong potential to make a difference in the tablet market. Not only that, but it appears that Microsoft may have found a possible solution for incorporating both a tablet and desktop OS that could offer us a totally new experience when it comes to the Windows environment. However, one must wonder if Microsoft has waited too long to join the tablet fray, especially since Amazon and Barnes & Noble seem to have successfully already jumped on this craze.

Microsoft’s slow uptake into this market, however, could possibly be traced to the company’s historic dependence on the Windows operating system and Office products to line its pockets. As a consumer, one must admit that the company has dominated these two software markets and that this concept has basically worked very well for it over the last 20 plus years. However, now there are two alternatives already in place that tablet makers are using: Apple’s iOS and Google’s Android. Their success in comparison to HP’s failed attempt to enter the tablet market with its webOS demonstrates how fickle consumers are about their tablet computers and the operating systems they use.

Has Microsoft Waited Too Long to Join the Tablet Craze?The next problem Microsoft will face is going to be the pricing for its Windows powered tablets, since the hardware requirements could demand a faster CPU and more memory for a Windows powered tablet to compete against the likes of the Apple iPad. This competition, from Apple, will be based on the great job — no, superb job — that Apple did in the creation of its iOS. That means that if Microsoft has to price its unit near that of the Apple iPad, its OS will have to be not just comparable but superior to what Apple is pricing for its popular units.

In addition, it is going to be forced to compete with the Amazon Kindle Fire, priced at $199, and the Barnes & Noble Nook tablet at $249; I doubt that Microsoft can meet these units’ prices. Part of Amazon and Barnes & Noble’s advantages are due to the fact that they are powered by variants of the Google Android operating system, and will rely on services to make their profits.

However, where Microsoft could remain competitive is in the production of tablets for the business environment. Most business companies are familiar with Windows and also Office. Windows paired with the Office suite comprise a comfortable environment for many, myself included, with the potential to compete in the higher end tablet marketplace. But while consumers have flocked in droves to tablet computers, will businesses follow in the consumers’ footsteps? It should be interesting to see how well Microsoft will do, once it finally gets Windows 8 to the marketplace.

Comments welcome.

Article Written by

I have been writing for LockerGnome since relocating to Missouri seven years ago, where I continue to be a technology enthusiast who enjoys playing with the newest and latest gadgets.

  • http://www.anthonyguidetti.com Anthony Guidetti

    In the consumer’s eye, I’d had to say yes. Microsoft has a label of “un-cool”, with Apple having the opposite. I think that Windows 8 tablets will sell best with businesses, with few consumers.

  • Joseph LeVine

    The tablet computing environment cannot even be considered mature yet. It is not a matter of Microsoft coming to market at “this time”. It is a matter of the quality of their product. Apple has historically been over priced since their inception and they still are. Microsoft has an opportunity to tap their loyal customers with a tablet as good as or better than the iPad. If Microsoft is able to produce a multi-media desktop replacement in the tablet form factor that would be a selling point to me. If they were able to incorporate a 3D GUI as well as 15 megapixel HD cameras (front & back). They should also incorporate stereo microphones and multiple USB 3.0 ports. The cherry on the top would be an integrated LED projector which would make carrying a power brick around completely acceptable.

  • Anonymous

    I have 3 words for you, “SoC”, I’ll wait patiently for Microsoft to get it and Windows 8 out. 
    @AnthonyGuidetti:disqus Windows “un-cool”?,… tell that to the 80% plus Computer Systems out there and the People Living in-front of them.  The onslaught on the World’s Number one PC OS is as old as the PC, and the so-called ”Cool” Mac has now reached what 8% or maybe 10% market share?  It’s been a debate for as long as these 2 existed, but with the friendliest intentions, you must be one of those who haven’t seen what I can make my Windows do. :)

  • Philip Henry

    Microsoft can go which ever way they want to with windows, does not concern me at all, i stopped using it 8months ago when i got tired of XP crashing, i switched to Linux Mint 9 and have been nothing but happy since.  The more i use it the more i love it.