Mozilla to Push out Silent Updates for Firefox 10

The folks over at Mozilla once updated their version 4 browser behind the scenes with no user intervention. Mozilla ceased what are being called ‘silent updates’ and after version 4 left the decision up to the user whether to accept an update or not. But this now seems to be coming to an end when the company introduces its newest Firefox version 10 for public consumption. Google has had a similar policy in place and it appears Mozilla has decided to follow Google’s lead.

The Mozilla team has been on a quest that is starting to alienate some consumers and which can only be described as ‘update fatigue.’ Mozilla has been pushing out updates every six weeks or so and the process has not always been bug free. For those people who write add-ons for the Firefox browser, they must feel that they are on a merry-go-round with no off switch. These developers of the add-ons must continually update their products to keep up with the constant changes as well.

Mozilla to Push out Silent Updates for Firefox 10What is disturbing about the entire update process is that Mozilla has decided to override the built in UAC that was developed to protect the Windows operating system. In addition, some users have experienced problems with some of the add-ons they have chosen to use on their system after an unwelcome update. Others have complained of unwanted add-ons being added without the user’s permission. What is ironic is that the team at Mozilla was critical of Google for circumventing the UAC of Windows Vista and Windows 7, which seems to be the same road that Mozilla has chosen.

I believe that Mozilla is providing too many updates, too quickly. Some of the major issues that I have complained about, like memory consumption, have been ignored for years. In my opinion, the Mozilla team needs to reevaluate its silent update proposal and hopefully not implement this process.

Just my two cents. What do you think?

Comments welcome.

Article Written by

I have been writing for Lockergnome for eight years.