What A Google OS Will Mean To You And Me

For years Linux has tried to become a viable operating system, but has garnered less than 1% of the market place. Though Mac users proclaim the simplicity of the Apple operating system, the high price of their hardware has kept many of us from making the switch. Microsoft with their Windows system still has a 90% plus market share. No matter how many complaints we hear about Windows, in particular Windows Vista, and how poorly Windows works the majority of us still use it. That was than and this is now. With little fanfare Google made an announcement on their web site last evening, 07-07-09, that a Google OS was coming in mid 2010.

Google states on their blog site the following information:

Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks. Later this year we will open-source its code, and netbooks running Google Chrome OS will be available for consumers in the second half of 2010. Because we’re already talking to partners about the project, and we’ll soon be working with the open source community, we wanted to share our vision now so everyone understands what we are trying to achieve.

Speed, simplicity and security are the key aspects of Google Chrome OS. We’re designing the OS to be fast and lightweight, to start up and get you onto the web in a few seconds. The user interface is minimal to stay out of your way, and most of the user experience takes place on the web. And as we did for the Google Chrome browser, we are going back to the basics and completely redesigning the underlying security architecture of the OS so that users don’t have to deal with viruses, malware and security updates. It should just work.

First we need to analyze the impact of what the Google Chrome operating system will have on the way we all will compute in the future. This statement:

Google Chrome OS is an open source, lightweight operating system that will initially be targeted at netbooks.

The word initially is a keyword. What this means is that Google is looking at the Netbook computers first, but will eventually port the operating system onto other computers such as laptops and desktop systems.

Next is this statement:

And as we did for the Google Chrome browser, we are going back to the basics and completely redesigning the underlying security architecture of the OS so that users don’t have to deal with viruses, malware and security updates. It should just work.

This says it all folks. We have been pounding on Microsoft for years asking for a operating system that just works. An operating system that is impervious to attack by viruses, malware and other stuff that can attack our computers. An operating system that doesn’t need a ton of updates that can and has rendered some computers to not function after an update is applied.

Google also states the following as well:

We hear a lot from our users and their message is clear — computers need to get better. People want to get to their email instantly, without wasting time waiting for their computers to boot and browsers to start up. They want their computers to always run as fast as when they first bought them. They want their data to be accessible to them wherever they are and not have to worry about losing their computer or forgetting to back up files. Even more importantly, they don’t want to spend hours configuring their computers to work with every new piece of hardware, or have to worry about constant software updates. And any time our users have a better computing experience, Google benefits as well by having happier users who are more likely to spend time on the Internet.

This strikes home, Especially this statement:

They want their computers to always run as fast as when they first bought them.

Wouldn’t this be nice. We have all experienced the slow down that happens using Windows. You can blame any number of things that can cause a system to slow. Anti-virus programs from Symantec and McAfee are notorious for bringing systems to a crawl. We throw more and more RAM on our systems trying to keep them from slowing down. But overall, this added weight of Windows and the programs we need to run in order to protect the OS takes its toll.

Having access to your data, not having to worry about backing up your stuff, all of this coupled with all of the above is going to knock Windows for a loop. Our systems will run better, run faster, be immune to attack while offering us the ability to store our stuff in a cloud environment. It doesn’t get any better than this.

The bottom line is this. Thank you Google. I look forward to using your new operating system.

Comments welcome.

Source.

PS There was one other sentence in the Google announcement:

However, the operating systems that browsers run on were designed in an era where there was no web.

I wonder who Google is talking about? LOL

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I have been writing for Lockergnome for eight years.