How to Install Android on a Nook Color

We live in a world where we can’t just have a device; we need to hack it and force it to do things that it may not have been designed to do. One really good example is the Nook Color. Not only has it been hacked to run Android, but it’s been done in such a way that the end-user can do it easily. I haven’t even gotten to the best part: it doesn’t void your warranty. If you were one of the lucky ones to pick up a Nook Color or Nook Tablet, you’re eligible to pick up a card that magically transforms your plain tablet into the most amazing Android-powered tablet ever.

One of the biggest things to outline in the Nook to Android system is how simple it is to use. It’s literally a four-step process and you’re up and running with Android on your shiny tablet in no time. Some of you might ask why you would want to put Android on your Nook Color, and there are a couple of reasons behind it. Most other Android-based tablets are very expensive and usually are tied to a cellular carrier that offers Internet that may be required to run the device. The Nook Color and even the Nook Tablet are very affordable devices that won’t break your wallet when you buy them. For an entry-level tablet owner, or if you’re someone who doesn’t know if a tablet is right for them, this setup maybe the best for the uncertain. At around $200 for the tablet and Android card, this is a great deal for those who may have a limited budget.

How to Install Android on a Nook Color

As mentioned before, this isn’t going to void your Nook warranty. Like other methods of putting different software on devices, you can do this easily with this setup and be assured that, if your Nook malfunctions, you’re fully under warranty. Many other methods may have you root the device, which instantly breaks your warranty if the device is ever in need of repair by the manufacturer. With the Nook to Android card, you never have to worry about any complicated methods or hacks to put the operating system on to the device. The installation is done in four easy steps that are so simple a Klingon could do it.

If I’m not mistaken, the Nook to Android system is the easiest way to put Android on a device. First, you need to turn off your Nook and make sure that it is totally powered down. With the microSD card provided, you insert it into the microSD card slot found on the back of the Nook. Once installed, it’s as easy as booting up the Nook again and letting the software go to work and boot directly into Android. The last step, obviously, is to enjoy your Nook tablet as a complete Android tablet with access to everything that normal Android tablets have. Plus, if you get bored with Android or want to switch back, just power off the device, take out the microSD card, and you’ll be back to Nook’s interface.

One of the obvious questions bound to be asked is what version of Android it is running. The current Android to Nook microSD cards pack Gingerbread onto your device. The next question that will usually come up is “Why isn’t it running the latest Android version?” Our answer is not very complex: it’s stable. Sure, we live in a world where we need the latest and greatest instantly (that’s why I became an Apple Developer and am running iOS 6 before anyone else gets it, but that’s not the point). But anything later than Gingerbread isn’t stable on the Nook. Gingerbread runs completely fine on the Nook Color with no odd crashes. If you are a first time Android user, no worries, Nook to Android has you covered with an extensive help center that will get even the most novice of users up and running fast.

How to Install Android on a Nook Color

Even though the Nook library is filled with some amazing titles of the latest books, nothing beats the Amazon Kindle Store. Chances are that you already have an Amazon account and therefore you also have an Kindle account where you have access to an astounding collection of paid and even free books. With the Android software installed on your Nook Color, you have the best of both worlds with access to both of these amazing stores that offer, combined, the biggest collection of e-book titles out there.

Not convinced yet? With Android running on your Nook, you have access to the full Google Play library of games, productivity, and other apps to make your device more than it is. With Android on your Nook, you can finally play that game of Angry Birds or, if you’re not the gaming type, there’s the entire Google Play Store with everything and anything that you could ever do with a stock Android tablet.

How to Install Android on a Nook Color

From our short testing, the device works very well and has no clear flaws in its system. The software is pretty slick and offers you the ability to squeeze even more usability out of the reading tablet. It’s a very good buy for those wanting to get into the tablet market place but who may not want to spend the massive amount of cash to pick up something like the iPad. If you are the owner of a Kindle Fire or other Android, this may not be the device for you since you can get the same functions out of them. Always remember that, if you feel like the Android system on your Nook device isn’t worth it or want to go back to the standard Nook interface, just slip out that microSD card and you’re good to go. This really is the simplest system that you could ever buy to turn your device into a fully working and functioning Android tablet. If at any time you are unsatisfied with the Android to Nook device, you can return the card within 30-days and, if you come to any trouble at all, there’s customer support and a very helpful community of experts that can help you diagnose the problem.

If you already own a Nook Color, you might want to think about picking up Nook to Android today.

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  • Alex Bivolcic

    Nice Article Craighton

  • Patrick Roberts

    Great article, thanks for sharing

  • Matthew Cheung

    Nice article :)

  • http://www.stirringtroubleinternationally.com/ Stirring Trouble International

    Looks great,well done.

  • http://angrykeyboarder.com/ angrykeyboarder

    Why not just get a Nexus 7 tablet (with Android 4.1) instead?